JALT2017 Technology In Teaching (TnT) Workshops

Digital technology for teaching and learning

Friday, 17 November 2017, 1:30 - 7:00 PM

As digital communications technologies become embedded in language education, teachers face the challenge of selecting appropriate tools and learning how to use them. The aim of the JALT pre-conference Technology in Teaching (TnT) workshops is to help teachers find their way through the exciting array of technologies available, select those that are appropriate for their teaching context, and learn how to effectively make use of them in the classroom. The TnT presenters, all experts in technology, will offer guidance on using technology and share ways to best integrate technology with language teaching practices. Participants should bring along a wifi or cellular connected device to participate fully in sessions.

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TnT Presentation Schedule (Friday, Nov. 25)

1st Session (1:30 - 3:00) 2nd Session (3:30 - 5:00) 3rd Session (5:30 - 7:00)
Bob Cvitkovic
LiveCode: Software for Research and Education
Peter Brereton
Writing Feedback: Using Wikis & Screencasts
Rab Paterson
Cloud's Eye View of Google: What It Can Do for You
Charles Browne
Utilizing Fee Online Tools to Teach Vocabulary
Nina Kang & Barry Griner
Stress-Free Testing Through Use of Polling Apps
Nadine Richard & Mari Arjona Toledo
Simple Tools for Flipped / Interactive Classrooms
Simon Bibby
Connect and Deliver: Use Facebook & Google Drive
Branden Kirchmeyer
Getting (and Keeping) It Together with OneNote
Mark deBoer
Using Moodle to Foster Student Collaboration
Daniel Dusza
Integrated Technology - Transforming EFL Classes
Joseph Tomei
LINE: Use What All the Cool Kids Use
Paul Daniels
Using Web Speech Technology in the Speaking Class
Gary Ross
Online Speech: A New Way to Practice Conversation
Rich Bailey
Teach Smarter: Mobile Assisted Language Learning
Mark Shrosbree
Technology for Output Practice


Teach Smarter: Mobile Assisted Language Learning

Rich Bailey

With nearly every student having Internet-connected devices, knowledge of mobile assisted language learning (MALL), especially “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) possibilities in and out of the classroom are extremely important. This presentation will focus on tried and tested MALL ideas and BYOD four-skills activities, as well as how educators can streamline and enhance their own teaching with technology.  Participants will be able to ask questions and share their own experiences with teaching with mobile technology. They will also leave with a better understanding of MALL and BYOD, along with the knowledge to implement it in their own classrooms.
Rich Bailey is an Associate Professor in the International Education Center at Tokai University (Shonan Campus in Kanagawa). He has taught English since 1994 in the United States, Kazakhstan, and now Japan. In the last eight years of teaching, he has focused on exploring ways to incorporate mobile assisted language learning (MALL) into his teaching, including many presentations about MALL and other topics at JALT, JALTCALL, and international conferences.


Connect and Deliver: Use Facebook & Google Drive

Simon Bibby

Are you looking to improve communications with and between students? Do you want an easy way to deliver video materials to students? Perhaps you wish to give more directed and immediate writing feedback? Are you searching for better tools for online student collaboration? Google Drive and Facebook are free and powerful tools to use with language learners, and you can do all such things and more, quite easily. This workshop offers demonstrations of how to use the two free and powerful tools Facebook Groups and Google Drive in your classes, and how to use them effectively together. I demonstrate to participants how to get started with both, and show how I get students started in classes too. I then demonstrate the usefulness of the tools for a number of teaching and administrative tasks. No prior experience is required nor expected, but existing Facebook and Google accounts may be helpful.
Simon Bibby is a faculty member in the English Department at Kobe Shoin Women’s University, and is co-coordinator of the JALT Literature in Language Teaching SIG. He originally qualified with a PGCE as a secondary school ICT teacher, and later gained an MA in Educational Technology and TESOL. He is currently a doctoral candidate at Liverpool University. He uses assorted technologies in his language classes. Outside of academia he plays chess, and is a busy parent of two young boys.


Writing Feedback: Using Wikis & Screencasts

Peter Brereton

Do your students struggle to understand your feedback on their writing? Do they even bother to read it all? Does this feedback ‘feed forward’ into their future writing? This workshop aims to show how collaborative online wikis – websites which are editable by any user – can be used to foster a positive learning environment, promote peer correction, and encourage learners to learn from each other. There will also be an emphasis on how voice screencast software can be used to improve the quantity and quality of feedback we provide on our learners’ writing, and engage learners more in the feedback process. The presenter will provide data from an Action Research project carried out in 2015 and published in 2016 to show how these two methods combined to provide tangible progress for his learners' IELTS writing.
Peter Brereton is Program Manager of Rikkyo University's English Discussion Centre and is also a DELTA Local Tutor. He previously worked as University Coordinator, and ICT Coordinator at British Council in Tokyo. Prior to working in Japan, he worked at British Council in Madrid and has also taught in other parts of Spain, the UK, Ireland, Australia, Latvia, and France. Peter holds a CELTA and DELTA and has almost finished his MA in TESOL. He specialises in EAP, exam classes and university courses, while his current interests include learner progress and feedback methods, materials and syllabus development, and teacher training.


Utilizing Fee Online Tools to Teach Vocabulary

Charles Browne

This presentation will briefly introduce four open-source, corpus-derived high frequency vocabulary word lists that the presenter helped to create for second language learners of English. The lists include the New General Service List (NGSL) for core general vocabulary, the New Academic Word List (NAWL) for important academic vocabulary, the Business Service List (BSL) for general business English and the TOEIC Service Lists (TS)L for TOEIC test preparation. The second half of the session will introduce and demonstrate a large and growing number of free online tools and resources for helping to utilize these lists for teaching, learning, materials creation as well as research and analysis. The tools include interactive flashcards, diagnostic tests, games, vocabulary profiling apps, text creation tools, and more.
Charles Browne is Professor of Applied Linguistics and TESOL at Meiji Gakuin University. He is a specialist in Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Extensive Reading, especially as they apply to online learning environments, and has written dozens of research articles, books, and textbooks over his 30 years in Japan. In addition to his work in creating several important new corpus-based word lists and a wide range of free online tools to teach, learn and create texts based on these lists, he has also developed many free online ER/EL and vocabulary learning sites, tools and apps, working hard to share this knowledge through countless presentations, seminars and hand-on workshops around the world.


LiveCode: Software for Research and Education

Bob Cvitkovic

This workshop will introduce recent developments to LiveCode (LC) – free app creation software. Since the last time I presented on LC, several years ago, it has expanded its feature set significantly. Apps designed in LC allow users to port to 6 platforms including iOS, Android, MacOS, Windows, Linix and HTML5 with the same code base. The low bar to entry allows beginner coders to create working apps immediately for desktop that their students can use in and out of class. Intermediate and advanced programmers can create their own custom controls and research collection systems, and much more. This workshop will mainly be a demonstration of the potential of LiveCode for (a) in-class educational applications for desktop, (b) research data collection systems, and (c) educational app development for mobile platforms. Examples of each category will be given. Time will be allocated for questions. Interested participants can check out www.livecode.com.
Bob Cvitkovic is a lecturer at Tokai University, Japan. His research interests include investigating the instructional efficiency of English educational apps. His background is in cognitive theory of multimedia learning principles and self-determination theory. He is currently the primary investigator on a MEXT grant and is co-investigator on two others, exploring of the role that digital platforms play in English education in the 21st century. He also builds and develops apps in his spare time.


Using web speech technology in the speaking class

Paul Daniels

This workshop explores recent advances in online speech technology and demonstrates how web speech can be used to create speaking activities that can be tailored to individual goals, needs, and interests. By using web speech technology, student speech can be automatically captured, recognized, and analyzed, and automated feedback can also be generated. The presenter will discuss how web-based speaking activities can be used in combination with classroom pair work, presentations, and online language exchanges. The speaking activities introduced in this workshop are designed to be administered within the Moodle course management system using Google’s Chrome browser. For a hands-on experience of the speaking activities, participants should bring along a Windows or Macintosh computer with Google Chrome installed.
Paul Daniels is a professor at Kochi University of Technology. His research involves CALL, ESP and project-based-instruction. He actively develops Moodle plugins and mobile apps for language learning.


Using Moodle to Foster Student Collaboration

Mark deBoer

In this workshop, the presenter will demonstrate how to set up an online course that fosters learner autonomy and learner collaboration. This will include setting up activities, such as forums and quizzes, with a minimal amount of resources, plus creating a solid course framework. Moodle beginners and experts are welcome! The presenter will also introduce a new concept of the flipped classroom and show how it can be integrated with an online course. The audience should be prepared to discuss their current syllabi, and how they envision their online and face-to-face classroom environment. The presenter will help them identify ways to effectively put their courses online and blend them with classroom learning to put the onus on the learners to take responsibility for their learning and become more effective mediators and collaborators. The audience will walk away understanding how to create a very simple, yet very powerful online based course.
Mark deBoer is a lecturer at Akita International University. He is a PhD Candidate at the University of Birmingham. He has given Moodle workshops in Europe and in Japan. His current research focuses on collaboration in online and face-to-face environments specifically with learner-learner mediation. He has designed online courses for Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) for chemistry, biology, and now for English for Academic Purposes (EAP). He is currently integrating an EPOS (Electronic Portfolio System) with Moodle to bring CEFR to learners for self-evaluation purposes. Mark is a semi-professional cellist and enjoys mountain and road cycling.


Integrated Technology - Transforming EFL Classes

Daniel Dusza

This workshop tackles both difficult and fundamental issues of when and how to design and integrate effective learning experiences with new technology. Language learning integrated with technology across a variety of subject areas is effective in stimulating meta-cognitive skills. However, effective integration is no guarantee to enhanced learning. Therefore, methods of scaffolding, jigsaw activities, task-based approaches will be presented to provide participants with some skills to avoid common misconceptions and barriers to effective integration of technology in English foreign language classes. Participants should also become aware of how to assess apps and websites and better understand how to integrate them into their lessons and curriculum. After a brief presentation, participants will work together to transforming a simple lesson plan using concepts, methods and approaches that will be suitable for teachers implementing technology in primary, secondary and tertiary education.
Daniel Dusza (MTesol, MPM, MBA, Beng) is a teacher/researcher with more than 20 years’ experience of integrating technology into education. His passion is advancing the use of technology in the learning process, information delivery, use and practice, assessment, and feedback. He is currently working on paperless curriculum development, peer corrective feedback and collaborative learning with ICT and CALL. He is a reviewer for two journals in Japan and has presented and published for teacher-training programs and conferences in Japan. Finally, he is completing his doctoral thesis in developing corrective treatment for English as a Second Language writing beginners in Japan.


Stress-Free Testing through use of Polling Apps

Nina Kang & Barry Griner

Learning a language can be a daunting and embarrassing experience for students. Instructors must then facilitate and enhance language learning by incorporating forms of innovative technology to support their teaching. This presentation showcases how students can confidently engage in classroom activities through one such method – online polling apps. These free & easy-to-use apps can be used to test student knowledge or attitude, check student comprehension, collect summative assessment data, and even encourage peer teaching. Teaching advantages are numerous in using polling apps – maintaining student attention and interest during class, promoting student engagement, and providing essential information about classroom learning. Their applicability extends to the four basic language skills – listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Nina Kang, Ed.D. is a Senior Lecturer at the American Language Institute, University of Southern California (USC) where she teaches writing and oral skills. She has 15+ years of teaching experience in various parts of the world including her work for the US Department of State as an English Fellow in Bulgaria and Serbia & Montenegro and as a Specialist in Vietnam. Her interests include collaborative writing models, technology-enhanced teaching & learning, and online writing curriculum.
Barry D. Griner is a Master Lecturer at the University of Southern California (USC) and a contributing author to Teaching Pronunciation: A Course Book and Reference Guide (Cambridge University Press, 2010). He has an MA in Applied Linguistics and TESL from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Barry’s 30 years of experience includes ten years of TEFL in Japan, 19 years of TESL at UCLA and USC, and two years teaching writing at the Centre for English Language Communication, National University of Singapore. Barry has also been an academic specialist for the US State Department in Uzbekistan and Armenia.

Getting (and Keeping) It Together with OneNote

Branden Kirchmeyer

Staying on top of things can be hard, especially when those ‘things’ include teaching a range of classes, implementing research projects, drafting publications, documenting professional development, and planning conferences. Technology can help with all that, but finding the right tool for the job can be a daunting task – especially if you’re not so tech-savvy. In this workshop, you’ll be introduced to Microsoft’s OneNote, a top-rated free productivity software (available on Windows, OS, iOS, and Android). Using authentic templates that showcase OneNote’s versatility, you’ll explore some of the features and functions that make this a top-rated program for productivity. Though helpful, experience with other Microsoft Office products (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc.) is not required to benefit from this introductory-level workshop.
Branden Kirchmeyer is a Senior Assistant Professor at Sojo University in Kumamoto, Japan. He is currently invested in several CALL-related research projects that include LMS course management and database development, and relies heavily on OneNote to keep everything sorted. He is a Google Certified Educator and serves as President/Web Admin for JALT’s NanKyu Chapter.


Cloud's Eye View of Google: What It Can Do for You

Rab Paterson

This session will give a general overview of the many different apps and tools Google has to offer as most people are unaware of just how much a Google account has under the hood. Time permitting, we will explore some of the more useful bits and pieces for teachers that a private Gmail account has, such as Scholar, Books, Sites, YouTube, Docs, Notes, Slides, Groups and Communities and based on audience demand we will dig deeper into those apps and tools that interest people the most. So there will be something Googly (yes that’s a real word at Google) for everyone.
Rab Paterson is Principle Instructor at the Toyo University-UCLA Extension Center for Global Education, Director/Webmaster of the Asia Association for Global Studies, Fellow of the British Royal Asiatic Society, and member of many other ed-tech/teaching associations. He has a BA, MA, COETAIL and MS qualifications and is currently a doctoral candidate at University College London’s Institute of Education. Rab is also an Apple Distinguished Educator, a Google Innovator, Trainer, GEG Leader, and Educator.


Simple Tools for Flipped/Interactive Classrooms

Nadine Richard, Mari Arjona Toledo

We will present a panel of digital tools available on laptops and/or tablets, which can be used inside and outside of the classroom to make the language class more engaging and interactive. Our focus will be on the use of technology to give students a voice, by flipping roles, collecting and sharing student responses, and encouraging creativity, oral communication, and peer feedback. Hands-on activities will introduce simple tools for quick presentations, movie creation, voice recording, and fun surveys. We will present examples of successful projects from our K-9 immersion school, which can be easily applied to any age level. To fully benefit from this practical workshop, please bring your own device (laptop, tablet, or smartphone).
Nadine Richard is an Elementary teacher with a strong background in Computer Science. As an EdTech coordinator and language enthusiast, she loves to share best practices observed in other classrooms, and experiment effective ways to improve student learning with technology.
Mari Arjona Toledo is a Modern Foreign Language teacher who embraces change and the use of new technology as a way to empower students to become accountable, independent and confident learners. Technology is used in her classrooms as a tool to motivate students and best deliver the curriculum.


Online Speech: A New Way to Practice Conversation

Gary Ross

Online speech recognition and synthesis allows students to practice conversations on the web. This represents a major development in how we can implement speaking practice and will have a significant impact on speaking instruction. This talk will demonstrate a system, open to anyone to use, where students can role-play and drill conversations where such conversations are automatically graded and analyzed. The talk will touch on how speaking can be integrated with and extend other learning activities such as online video. The talk will also give a brief analysis of the data from over one million utterances practiced by the presenter's students. Those wishing to use the system hands-on during the talk should bring a microphone equipped laptop with Google Chrome.
Gary Ross has been developing, programming, and designing online educational systems for 20 years. He ran his own web design and consulting company for a number of years, and is presently an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Kanazawa University, where he is Directory of English, and develops the online ESL program. He is also the webmaster for JALTCALL. His research focus is on usability, use of computer speech, and the integration of mobile into the classroom.


Technology in Teaching Workshop Title: Technology for Output Practice

Mark Shrosbree

This workshop will focus on practical methodologies that all teachers can use whatever their level of expertise with technology. A number of ways of using technology to help students improve their speaking and writing skills will be introduced, together with relevant materials and links. There will be a particular focus on the use of students’ own mobile devices for innovative speaking activities. All the methodologies involve freely available applications, such as Google Drive, recording apps, and PDF readers. It is hoped that participants will leave the workshop with a range of ideas which they can use in the classroom.
Mark Shrosbree teaches at Tokai University in Kanagawa. His interests include course design, methodology and materials development, for both ESP and general EFL courses. He has a strong interest in using technology for communicative teaching. He runs regular “Lunchtime Workshops” at his university and maintains an online materials bank.


LINE: Use What All the Cool Kids Use

Joseph Tomei

This workshop is designed to help you either get started with LINE or find some tricks to help you manage your LINE usage more effectively. I am (still) a reluctant LINE user, but turned to it after the Kumamoto earthquake to quickly get in touch with students and discovered that it can be a great tool for communicating with students if you can avoid some pitfalls. If you have 1) never used LINE on your PC, or 2) have tried it and been put off by the interface, you will want to come to this workshop!
Joseph Tomei is a professor in the Faculty of British and American Studies, Department of Foreign Languages at Kumamoto Gakuen University. He has taught EFL in France, Spain, and Japan at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. In addition to his interest in computer-mediated communication, he also is interested in the application of functional/typological grammar to language teaching, practical activities in the language classroom, and writing instruction, especially the use of metaphor by EFL writers. He is also currently the National Auditor for JALT.

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