Ibaraki Chapter

December Meeting

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 5 December 2010 - 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Carolyn Graham, Anna Motohashi, and Adam Lebowitz

A. Featured Presentation:

Title: The Creative Classroom - Using Jazz Chantz, Poetry, Storytelling and Song.
Speaker: Carolyne Graham

Summary: This program will focus on the power of rhythm as a language learning tool. The brain loves rhythm and music and this leads to very fast memory. Teachers will learn how to create and perform Jazz Chants which are based on the powerful rhythm of American Jazz. This rhythm is exactly the same as the beat of spoken American English. Ms. Graham will present materials suitable for students of all ages and will describe step by step how to create and perform a Jazz Chant.

Bio-data: Carolyn Graham is an author, teacher-trainer and musician best known as the creator of Jazz Chants. She taught at New York University for twenty five years and at Harvard University for nine summers. She is currently training teachers in the NYU School of Education and presents a Public Lecture once a year at Columbia Teachers College in Tokyo. She presents teacher training workshops throughout the world, most recently in Malaysia and Peru. She is married to Eralp Akkoyunlu and lives in Istanbul and New York.

B. Chapter Member Presentations:

1. Title: JALT 2010: Sharing the Best of "Creativity: Think Outside the Box"
Presenter: Anna Motohashi

Summary: For all those who couldn’t make it to Nagoya this year, this presentation reviews the highlights of the JALT annual conference at the end of November. Touted as “something beyond the usual workshops and plenary speeches”, JALT 2010 suggests it will encourage participants to step outside the confines of everyday norms to consider our potential for personal and professional creativity. I’ll offer a summarized version of the proceedings along with practical sound bites for classroom application.

Bio-data: Originally from Wales, Anna taught English in the UK and Spain before coming to Japan. She has a Master’s degree in TESOL from Temple University and teaches at Kawamura Gakuen Women’s University in Chiba prefecture. Her research interests include the use of technology in the classroom, motivating students and English as a global language.

2. Title: Teaching the Star Spangled Banner (as accompanied on the shamisen)
Presenter: Adam Lebowitz

Summary:It is always a fun and interesting break to have one lesson of an English course dedicated to learning a song. While many teachers prefer songs with “international” content, I teach The Star Spangled Banner (aka, The National Anthem). The song is easy to teach because many students have heard the melody on at least one occasion. Because the song is a fixture of professional sports events, it is also significant to understanding American culture. In this talk I demonstrate strategies for teaching this song, beginning with identifying rhythmically-stressed words and reciting in tempo. Following a short comparison of anthems from different countries, the meaning of the song is demonstrated in the context of contemporary American politics and society.
When teaching music, teachers usually have students sing to a recording (which is easier than bringing a piano into the classroom). However, I prefer an instrument – the shamisen -- in the classroom to control tempo, pitch, and volume. Aside from being a beautiful and highly expressive instrument, the shamisen in the hands of the English instructor can be positive for the classroom because the teacher will appear interested in Japanese culture. In addition, through the instrument I encourage university students to devote this stage of their education to developing the ability to express thoughts and beliefs in both Japanese and English.

Bio-data: Adam Lebowitz is an Associate Professor at the U of Tsukuba. He was born and raised mainly on the east coast of the US, and has been living and teaching ESL in Japan for 20 years. He has been practicing the shamisen with teachers from the Fujimoto School for over 10 years.

C. Business Meeting

D. Year-End party after the meeting at a nearby restaurant

JALT Ibaraki chapter meetings are open to all interested in learning and teaching languages. Also check our website: http://ibarakijalt.blogspot.com/ for further information.

Location: 
Mito Shimin Kaikan
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

JALT Professional Development Symposium 2010

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 23 October 2010 - 9:00am - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Speakers will be anounced on the Symposium's site

The Ibaraki Chapter will be co-sponsoring this symposium along with West Tokyo, Gunma, Shizuoka, and Tokyo chaprters to be held at Tokai University's Shonan Campus.

Theme: Helping Learners Build Multiple Skills by setting Clear Goals, Developing Effective Methodologies, and Creating Appropriate materials.

Paticipating organizations: West Tokyo JALT, JALT Gunm,a, JALT Shizuoka, Ibaraki JALT, and Tokyo JALT.

Details of the symposium can be found at: http://teach.flc.u-tokai.ac.jp/teacher/course/view.php?id=42.

Location: 
Tokai University, Shonan Campus, Building 14
Fee for JALT members: 
N/A at this moment
Fee for one-day members: 
N/A at this moment

October All-day Meeting (A.M. and P.M. sessions)

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 10 October 2010 - 9:30am - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
(A.M.-Sanae Kawamoto and Hanna Schnack: P.M.- Lawrence Cisar and Tomoka Kaneko

09:30 Registration begins
10:00~11:45 (Morning Session)

Simple Sentences for Young Learners
by Sanae Kawamoto and Hanna Schnack

In this workshop, the presenters will show you how to teach vocabulary and simple sentences in a communicative way to young learners. This method can be used in adult classes too, especially for low-level beginners. The presenters will show you a couple of games using easy sentences that can help students learn in a fun way.

Sanae is an author, as well as the owner of the English conversation school "English Time." She currently has two English Time locations in Saitama. She started to learn English when she was 32, which is considered quite late to start learning a language in Japan. Sanae was a self-taught student and never attended any English conversation schools or studied abroad in her pursuit of learning English.

Hanna is an English communication teacher at Miyahara Junior High School and Omiya Besscho Elementary School in Saitama. She also works as a private teacher for the language school "English Time!". Hanna graduated university in Germany in Applied Cultural Sciences. Her main interest lies in foreign cultures and languages. That is the reason why she spent almost 2 years in Australia and currently lives in Japan.

11:45~:14:00 Lunch Break A Relaxed Stroll to the Food Court in Tsukuba Center

14:00~17:00 (Afternoon Session)
14:00 What Can I Do as a Member?
by Lawrence Cisar

What are your rights under the NPO law as a member of JALT? How do I do anything? How does a Chapter fit in the situation? This brief workshop will look at the NPO law and parliamentary procedure for the chapter member. The workshop will be done as an open discussion session.

Larry is a certified Parliamentarian and a Registered Parliamentarian. He has been teaching in Japan for 36 years and has been working with Parliamentary Procedure for several years. He loves sake and cold red wine.

15:00
Japanese Students’ Perceptions of Peer Feedback
by Tomoka Kaneko
This study investigated the nature of interaction during peer editing activities between Japanese university students who were not familiar with these types of activities. The analysis of the data indicated that the participants had little resistance toward the peer editing activities. Also, it proved that the participants’ good relationships as learners contributed to their positive perceptions of the peer editing activities. This resulted in their making most use of their peers’ feedback in their revisions.

Tomoka is teaching mainly at Ibaraki University. Her area of expertise is TESOL. Her interest in this area ranges widely, including nature of Japanese students' interaction in English and ways to improve each of their English skills. She is currently interested in what should constitute Japanese English learners' communicative competence considering both the globalized world and Japanese contexts and how the learners can achieve their goals.

16:00 Chapter Business Meeting & Annual Elections
(Book Fair will continue throughout the day.)

Location: 
Tsukuba Gakuin University Meeting Room 1 & 2 (second floor)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen (Free for students)

Creativity in the Classroom (four presentations)

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 30 May 2010 - 12:30pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Tomoka Kaneko, Tim Murphey, Atsushi Iida, and Samuel Nfor

Program starts at 1:00. (Doors open from 12:30. No pre-registration required!)
Presentations:

1. The Effects of Speaking Activity Attitudes on Willingness to Communicate and Classroom Speaking Anxiety
by Tomoka Kaneko, Ibaraki University

This study investigates the relationships between learners’ attitudes toward speaking activities, their willingness to communicate, and classroom speaking anxiety. Changes in these three variables were examined by administering three distinct measures to 120 college freshmen at the beginning and the end of the semester.

2. Creative Management and Learning: Speed-Song-Dictation-Conversational-Routines
by Tim Murphey, Kanda University of International Studies

Prof. Murphey will illustrate the use of Creative Management and Learning through Speed-Song-Dictation-Conversational-Routines, an easy and fun way to promote learning and manage classes in an innovative way. This technique promotes agency and puts student input to use.

3. Composing Haiku for Communicative Purposes
by Atsushi Iida, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how EFL writing instructors can use haiku for the purpose of developing communicative skills and writing with a greater sense of voice. The presenter will share a series of haiku writing activities to develop students’ voice.

4. Play Production in ESL/EFL Class
by Samuel Nfor,Tsukuba, Saitama, and Dokkyo Universities


Throughout history, drama has often been clasped to education, be it in the didactic sense of teaching a message, or in a rather integrated sense of processing experience. This presentation will develop around the latter. The possibilities and options for drama’s use in language acquisition will be discussed. We will take a look at the elements of the dramatic process that support language acquisition from raw script, to rehearsals, to performance.

JALT Ibaraki chapter meetings are open to all interested in learning and teaching languages.
Access information for the venue and further information are available on the chapter home page.

http://ibarakijalt.blogspot.com/

Support the Chapter Book Fair!
Donate your unwanted books – and get used books for 50 yen!

Location: 
Ibaraki Christian University (Bldg. 5), Hitachi Oomika, Hitachi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen (Free for students)

December Meeting

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 13 December 2009 (All day)
Speaker: 
J. Batten, G. MacLean, J. Bode, and others

1. Main Presentations
1.1. Another NVC - Nonviolent Communication - Both Verbal and Nonverbal
by Jim Batten, Ibaraki Christian University

Presentation Summary: You know the old taunt "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me"... well, my version is "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words can really hurt me." I have been reading a lot of Marshall B. Rosenberg's (and others that are now in that movement) books on nonviolent communication and would like to share some insights gained with the teachers and others interested in effective communication. We should be teaching more than just English grammar and syntax...we should be preparing students to communicate in a way that will be both most beneficial to them and to others. Some of our problems are sarcasm and snide remarks, loaded words, judgemental pronouncements, etc. Hopefully we can develop a better language of life.

1.2. Classroom Feedback Systems
by George MacLean, U of Tsukuba

1.3. Translation Strategies Applied to Japanese/Dutch
by Jeroen Bode, Ibaraki University

2. Poster Session

3. Short presentations by 4 chapter members

4. Bonenkai/Hanashikai at the Drunken Duck

Info: http://ibarakijalt.blogspot.com/
Non-members ¥500.-

Location: 
Mito Shimin Kaikan
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

October 4th All-day Meeting - Afternoon Program (Student Presentations)

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 4 October 2009 - 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Sun Ming Lin (Chrystal), Liu Mao (Maria), Keiko Iwasaki, Li Wei (Lily), and Liang Yueli

The following is the line up of five student presentations.

a. Title: Chinese Psychological Counseling (English)
This presenter is Sun Ming Lin (or you can call her Crystal). She is from Changchun in China. She majored in Social Psychology and also learned Business Administration. After graduating from Jilin University, she worked for two years with statistical data and as an office assistant. Then, she came to Japan and to Ibaraki University where she is furthering her studies at the Master's level in Social Psychology. After graduation, she wants to continue to study at the doctoral level. Crystal’s presentation will be about the status of Chinese Psychological Counseling. She will describe the institutional features and methodology utilized to council patients suffering from various psychological problems.

b. Title: Wordsworth’s Poem “Expostulation and Reply” (English)
Maria (Liu Mao) is a graduate student at Ibaraki University. She is from Mongolia, China. After graduating from the Inner Mongolian Universities for the Nationalities with a degree in English, she came to Japan to get a Master’s degree in English literature. Now, she is studying the poems of William Wordsworth, an English romantic poet. In the future, Maria hopes to go to an English-speaking country to learn more about English. Maria’s presentation will be about one of Wordsworth’s poems she has encountered during her literature studies. She will explore the form, content and unique qualities of this well-known poem.

c. Title: Vocabulary and Motivation (English)
Keiko Iwasaki comes from Nagano. She graduated from Ibaraki University this spring and is now a graduate student of Ibaraki University. She majored in English Education as L2 and got her license as an English teacher for high school. For that reason, she wants to become a high school teacher in the future.
The presenter will discuss the theme of her undergraduate thesis as a basis for her master’s thesis. She is interested in students’ motivation and the vocabulary knowledge of university students. She believes that there is a relationship between students’ motivation and vocabulary knowledge and will explore the theme of her undergraduate thesis with a view to deepening her research.

d. Good Communication Skills in Language Learning (English)
Lily (Li Wei) is from Harbin,China and she majored in English Education and English Literature at Harbin Normal University. After graduation from university, she took a job related to English teaching, but found it was necessary for her to conduct further studies at the Master’s level after working for four years. After moving to Ibaraki Prefecture, she was happy to meet Professor Cunningham and have a chance to learn with her. At present, as Professor Cunningham’s researcher, she is preparing for studies at the Master’s level in Intercultural Communication. Through further study she will make full use of this expertise in her research and work.
Depending on the learner`s experiences in language learning—English learning or Japanese learning—the presenter will describe the importance of good communication skills. In today’s world we need to be able to communicate effectively with all cultures. It is important to understand the different ways cultures are comfortable communicating. Lily believes this will help not only in our language learning and communication, but also in our work.

e. Title: The Differences of the Finance System Between China and Japan (English)
Liang Yueli is from Liao Ning China and her major is finance. After graduating from China Dongbei University of Finance & Economics, she came to Japan to study Japanese. She lived in Tokyo for one and a half years to study Japanese. Then, she came to Ibaraki University to further her studies as a research student of Finance Management. After graduating, Liang Yueli will return to China and teach finance at her university. The presenter will compare the differences in the financial system in China and Japan. She will discuss the structural features of each system and describe the major differences in theory and application.

Each presenter will speak for about 20 minutes and answer questions at the end of their presentation. After the presentations there will be a lottery to give away some books.

20 minutes = speaking
3 minutes = Q & A

After the presentation sessions, we will have:
Business Meeting at 4:00 p.m.

Direction in English: http://www.kasei.ac.jp/JALT/tsukuba-gdirc.html

Location: 
Tsukuba Gakuin University (Meeting Rooms 1 & 2), Tsukuba
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

October 4th All-day Meeting - Morning Program (An Inconvenience Truth about Interlanguage)

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 4 October 2009 - 9:30am - 11:50am
Speaker: 
Charles Kowalski

As every English teacher in Japan knows, Japanese-influenced English, or “interlanguage”, can lead learners to produce sentences that are (a) unintentionally comical, (b) very different from the intended meaning, (c) completely incomprehensible, or (d) all of the above. This presentation will focus on cross-linguistic studies to explain certain often-confused areas, such as the use of possessives in English, and the confusion of abstract nouns and adjectives that gives us “safety drivers”. It will include classroom activities to help clear up the confusion resulting from Japanese influence, and steps learners can take towards the ultimate goal of being able to think in English.

Charles Kowalski teaches English and directs the Japanese/English interpretation program at Tokai University in Kanagawa. He has presented extensively throughout Asia, and has twice received the “Best of JALT Award”.

One-day Meeting Schedule:
Registration at: 9:30 a.m.
Morning session: 10:00 - 12:00
Lunch break: 12:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Afternooon session at 2:00 p.m. (Student Presentations)
Business Meeting 4:00 p.m.

Direction in English: http://www.kasei.ac.jp/JALT/tsukuba-gdirc.html

Location: 
Tsukuba Gakuin University (Meeting Rooms 1 & 2), Tsukuba
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

May One-day Meeting/Afternoon Presentation: Cross-Cultural Issues in Education/Working in an Intenational Environment

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 10 May 2009 - 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Dr. James Banner (Hilderstone College, UK)

The seminar is a celebration of some of the differences in international cultures in
terms of etiquette, hygiene, forms of greetings, body language, food and drink,
with special emphasis on different learning styles and differing views on what
constitutes a good student, a good teacher and a good course.

The seminar will also explore how sometimes minor differences can lead to
tensions and misunderstanding, and suggest a cross-cultural strategy for working
in an international environment and for exploiting cross-cultural issues in the classroom.

Bio Data
James Banner is Director of External Courses at Hilderstone College, UK. He directed
the RSA Diploma in Teaching Foreign Languages to Adults, which Hilderstone piloted
with the University of Edinburgh, and a Certificate Programme in TFLA for Hilderstone
College in conjunction with Kent Adult Education and the University of Kent. He has
wide experience of teaching and training at all levels both in Britain and abroad and
has published articles on language teaching and cultural issues. Also, he has regularly
presented seminars on behalf of the British Council in Italy, Germany, Brazil, Spain and Japan.

Tea, Book Fair, Chapter Planning Meeting: 15:30-17:00
Please read the details of the moring presentation in a separate notice.

Location: 
Ibaraki Christian University (Bldg #5), Hitachi Omika 6-11-1
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

May One-day Meeting/Morning Presentation: Language Development - Vocabulary Teaching for Young Adults

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 10 May 2009 - 10:00am - 11:30am
Speaker: 
Dr. James Banner (Hilderstone College, UK)

This seminar will explore fertile areas and techniques for teaching vocabulary. These areas will
include art and design, cult objects, fashion, icons and figures from popular culture. This will
be especially useful for teachers of teenagers/young adults and young professionals.
Techniques covered will include memory exercises, word circles and learner training ideas.

OBJECTIVES

To provide teachers with some new ideas for vocabulary development and materials that they will be able
to adapt to their own use in class. The seminar will also serve as an opportunity to brush up on
pronunciation and current idiomatic use in British and American English.

Bio Data
James Banner is Director of External Courses at Hilderstone College, UK. He directed the RSA Diploma
in Teaching Foreign Languages to Adults, which Hilderstone piloted with the University of Edinburgh,
and a Certificate Programme in TFLA for Hilderstone College in conjunction with Kent Adult Education
and the University of Kent. He has wide experience of teaching and training at all levels both in Britain
and abroad and has published articles on language teaching and cultural issues. Also, he has regularly
presented seminars on behalf of the British Council in Italy, Germany, Brazil, Spain and Japan.

Lunch: 12:00-13:30 Join us in walking to, and dining at, a restaurant close to the campus.

The afternoon presentation will start at 14:00. See the separate notice for details.

Location: 
Ibaraki Christian University (Bldg #5), Hitachi Omika 6-11-1
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

February Meeting - Afternoon Program

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 15 February 2009 - 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Colin Graham

Program
Presentation Title: An Introduction to British Sign Language
Presenter: Colin Graham
Descripton: In this demonstration lesson, the presenter will teach some basic British Sign Language,
demonstrate some of the differences between it and other sign languages, and explain some of the
ways that signing can be incorporated into English lessons as a fun way for checking spelling.
It will also provide a means of demonstrating how a language can be taught from scratch.

Location: 
Ibaraki University, Room B101, Jinbun Gakubu Building
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
500 yen

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