Fukuoka Chapter

Two Presentations: 1) How to Write for JALT Publications, 2) Open Career Doors to EFL Teaching Positions in Colleges and Universities in Japan

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 16 January 2010 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Malcolm Swanson and Akiko Tsuda

Presentation 1: JALT offers a wide variety of opportunities for educators to publish and present in their fields of interest. However, submitting a proposal or manuscript is just the start of a long process, and, if not done properly, can lead to rejection from the outset. In this presentation, Malcolm Swanson will explain the submission and selection processes for both JALT's publications and its annual conference. He will also cover the review and editorial procedures, and offer advice for optimising your submissions.

Bio: Malcolm Swanson has had many years of experience in both JALT's publications and its conference planning. He currently teaches at Seinan Jo Gakuin University in Kitakyushu.

Presentation 2: Open Career Doors to EFL Teaching Positions in Colleges and Universities in Japan
Even experienced EFL professionals with MA degrees and Japanese language skills are likely to be bewildered by the lists of documents that need to be submitted when applying for teaching positions at universities in Japan. What may seem like common sense to you may not be applicable in the Japanese educational context, especially when applying for teaching positions. Some basic knowledge of the recruiting process in Japan together with some Japanese terminology for job hunting will assist you greatly in the job hunting process.

You are encouraged to bring your own resumes in English and/or Japanese, and also your lists of publications and educational achievements. The presenter will go through several points on how to prepare your documents and you are encouraged to share your own personal experiences and insights on job hunting. Japanese English teachers are welcome to attend this workshop as “volunteer career advisors”.

Akiko Tsuda, Nakamura Gakuen Jr. College, author of "Open Career Doors", a textbook for TOEIC preparation and basic business communication skills, will outline the current state of EFL programs and teaching positions in higher education in Japan, and will then discuss cross cultural communication differences in writing resumes and handling job interviews, with reference to actual recruiting ads and sample dialogues.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Satellite Campus, (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

Tender Teachers - How BOEs now "procure" teachers by tender bid

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 14 November 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Chris Flynn

The Ministry of Education appears to be putting more emphasis on communicative English in primary and secondary schools. To meet this demand the number of Assistant Language Teachers (ALTs) taking up positions at public schools has dramatically increased over the past decade. However, due to financial pressures on local governments, the method of procuring ALTs has taken a dramatic change from directly hiring ALTs on the JET Program, to acquiring ALTs by tender. Currently all ALTs in Fukuoka City and Kitakyushu City schools are “procured” by tender. Forty prefectural high schools also use outsourced ALTs.
The presentation will detail how the tendering process is carried out, focusing on the problems facing teachers who work for the “dispatch” companies. Over the past few years I have obtained thousands of pages of documentation through the Freedom of Information Act, and have pieced together how the dispatch companies make profits by keeping costs (ALT salary etc.) to a minimum.
Chris Flynn is a Professor in the Faculty of Management and Information Sciences at the Kyushu Institute of Information Sciences.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Tenjin Satellite Campus (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

Curriculum Development for Language Teachers

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 31 October 2009 - 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Dr. Katerina Petchko (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies and TUJ)

The goal of this presentation is to provide language teachers with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed to plan, develop, and implement a systematic language curriculum. The presentation will provide an overview of the field of curriculum including topics such as: the philosophical foundations of curriculum; the role of society and culture in curriculum development; and learning theory and human development as considerations for curriculum design. The focus will be on educational practice and language curricula in Japan. This event is sponsored by Temple University Japan.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Tenjin Satellite Campus (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
Free

Motivation and Identity: Three Presentations

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 19 September 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Tim Prichard, Sunao Fukunaga, and Quint Baldwin

For this event, we will have three presentations on the general theme of motivation and identity. These presentations are based on studies that explore beliefs of teaching and learning using different conceptual frameworks.

Tim Pritchard, Kyushu Sangyo University
Amotivation, Extrinsic and Intrinsic Orientation and Proficiency in Japanese Students of English at Two Tertiary Institutions
This presentation presents results of a preliminary questionnaire-based study investigating motivational orientations of Japanese learners of English at two tertiary institutions. The results are discussed using Deci and Ryan’s (2004) self-determination continuum based on their Organismic Integration Theory, which suggests that external motivation can develop into a more intrinsic motivation.
____________
Sunao Fukunaga, Koryo Senior High School/University of Washington, Seattle
Exploring Experienced Japanese High School English Teachers’ Professional Identity
This study investigates the relationship between experienced Japanese English teachers’ professional identity and its influence on teaching practice. The result indicates that the teachers share a belief: Teaching practice should not be merely teaching the subject matter, but rather the bedrock of a student’s growing processes as a whole person.
____________
Quint Baldwin, Kyushu Sangyo University
Autonomy and Motivation
Research suggests that teachers may tend towards either aiming to control students, or provide opportunities for autonomous learning. Of these orientations, autonomy-oriented behaviors are widely believed to improve student motivation. This presentation will define autonomy and self-regulation and discuss interim results from the first semester of a study exploring teachers’ behaviors affect on student motivation and achievement.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Tenjin Satellite Campus (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

4th ANNUAL FUKUOKA JALT APPLIED LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM

Date and Time: 
Sunday, 26 July 2009 - 11:30am - 4:30pm
Speaker: 
Many Presenters, See Below

4th Annual FUKUOKA JALT
APPLIED LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin University (Osa Main Campus)
Sunday, July 26, 2009
Note: This event will be at a different venue from past events, see note at the end for access information.
Time Featured Speaker: Kristen Sullivan
12:00-12:55
Teaching/Learning Principles for Oral Communication Courses, Kristen Sullivan
The presenter will introduce the teaching/learning principles she believes are crucial for oral communication courses and will discuss how they were incorporated into the oral communication textbook Impact Conversation 1 & 2 (Pearson Longman) and how she applies them in her own classes.
Kristen Sullivan is a lecturer at Shimonoseki City University where she teaches Academic English, TOEFL, Composition and Oral Communication. She is co-author of the oral communication textbook Impact Conversation published by Pearson Longman.
TIME PRESENTATION TITLES and PRESENTERS
1:00-1:25
Metalanguage knowledge of low proficiency EFL learners, Miki Tokunaga
Self-identity as Motivator in EFL Learning: Undergraduate Japanese case Study, Paul Turner
1:30-1:55
Item and Rater Performance in Dictation Achievement Tests, Trevor Holster
Exploring experienced Japanese English high school teachers’ professional identity, Sunao Fukunaga
2:00-2:25
Slide Presentation Skills for Researchers, Jane Harland
Using Mind Mapping in EFL Reading Class, Yuko Yamashita
2:30-2:55
Amotivation, Extrinsic and Intrinsic Orientation and Proficiency in Japanese Students of English at Two Tertiary Institutions, Tim Pritchard
M-learning vocabulary tasks, Aaron Gibson & Jeff Anderson
3:00-3:25
Cultural Load: Effects on Students and Teachers in the Second Language Classroom, Stewart Viita & J. Lake
Affecting outcomes: Teacher/student beliefs of ALC net learning, Stella Millikan
3:30-3:55
The History of English Teaching in Japan and the Relative Status of English Language and Literature Classes, Sharmine Barriga & J. Lake
Primary School - Eigo Note: Implications for Future English Education in Japan, Harry Carley
4:00-4:25
Using debate to teach integrated skills in English classrooms: Tips to get intermediate and lower proficiency students to debate, Wakako Pennington
Examining the Roles of “Oh” in Spoken American English Using the Corpus of Contemporary American English, Jack Brajcich
Note: The venue for this event will be in a different location from previous events. If you take the bus you may need to walk a short distance because the bus takes a different route on Sundays.
An English map can be found here: http://www2.fukujo.ac.jp/university/english/access.html
A Japanese map can be found here:
http://www2.fukujo.ac.jp/university/access/index.html
If you have any questions, please contact: Jack Brajcich, email: ;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;">&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;&;

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin University (Osa Main Campus) Bldg. 4, 1st Floor
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

Using the appraisal framework: An introduction for language researchers

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 6 June 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Alexanne Don, University of Birmingham, UK and University of Sydney Australia

The appraisal framework provides a means of classifying instances of evaluative lexis and evaluative moves in discourse. The types of evaluative language used in any set of texts depend crucially on the social purposes these texts are meant to serve, and thus appraisal analysis can reveal something about the social context in which any set of texts takes part, as well as the interpersonal orientation of the speaker/writer toward his or her interlocutors. The first part of the presentation will provide a necessarily brief outline of the appraisal framework, while the second part will provide an opportunity to perform some analyses of sample texts for comparative purposes.
Pedagogical applications for the appraisal framework have so far been concerned with the academic literacy and the notion of authority or voice, especially with 2nd language learners in tertiary studies (see for example, Hood 2005, Tang 2004), the genre of history (e.g. Coffin 2000), and genre-based pedagogy in schools (see Iedema et al 1998 (2008)). The session will conclude with a discussion of possibilities for application of the framework in the academic context in Japan.
Bio: Alexanne Don worked in Japan for eleven years, teaching English at a variety of institutions in Fukuoka, before moving to the UK in 2000 to pursue her academic research on the linguistics of email list interaction. She obtained her doctorate from the University of Birmingham in 2007, after moving back to Australia. Her research interests concern applications of Systemic Functional Linguistics—including genre pedagogy, Critical Discourse Analysis, and the use of the Appraisal framework in the investigation of argument structure. She is Honorary Associate in the Department of Linguistics, University of Sydney, and is presently involved in a collection theorising the language of power and solidarity.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Satellite Campus, (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

Literature for the Language Class

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 7 March 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Dr. Patrick Rosenkjar, Temple University, Japan Campus

Most Japanese students (and many teachers of English as well) believe that poems, short stories, and plays have little or no place in classrooms oriented to developing communicative competence in English or that literary texts are only for advanced learners. In fact, Japanese students often say that the study of both English and Japanese literary texts is boring and difficult. This unfortunate situation is probably the result of teaching literature in the wrong way: choosing extremely difficult texts, relying on word-for-word translation, and lecturing to students (often in Japanese) on literary criticism and the meaning of English texts. For EFL learners, this is surely not the way to develop either language skills or literary appreciation.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Satellite Campus, (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

Two Presentations: Demotivators in Language Learning; and, Questionnaire Construction and Analysis with Rasch, Factor Analysis, and Structure Equation Modeling

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 21 February 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Keita Kikuchi, Waseda University

Two presentations will be given, one focused on more practical issues of how students are demotivated in language classrooms and one focused on research on how demotivators can be measured and analyzed.

Demotivators in English Language Learning
How can teachers help students to be more motivated to learn a foreign language? This is a question that many foreign language teachers ask themselves. I identify common demotivators based on the findings of several qualitative and quantitative studies of demotivation.

Questionnaire Construction and Analysis with Rasch, Factor Analysis, and Structure Equation Modeling

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Satellite Campus, (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen
  • Chapter President: Pellowe, Bill
  • Membership Chair: Marini, Dominic
  • Program Chair: Lake, J.
  • Publicity Chair: Paton, Steve
  • Treasurer: Pritchard, Tim

Pragmatics in a Film Corpus: Challenging Assumptions about Authenticity

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 31 January 2009 - 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Speaker: 
Dr. Donna Tatsuki, Kobe City University of Foreign Studies

It is generally believed that in EFL contexts like we have in Japan, film or video is a significant source of input for our learners. But how valid are our assumptions? Hasn’t there been a generally uncritical acceptance of these assumptions? What has been missing, however, are studies to see in what ways film and media materials faithfully reflect the ordinary language used in natural conversations in the “real world” and in what ways they might deviate,-if ever so slightly. This presentation will summarize some of the findings of a 4-year project to assemble and analyze a teacher-selected film dialogue corpus as well as look at some of the teaching materials that evolved from the project.

Location: 
Fukuoka Jo Gakuin Satellite Campus, (9F), Tenjin 2-8-38, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen

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