Akita Chapter

Using TV Commercials as Language Teaching Tools

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 12 December 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Phil McCasland, Director of Programs for JALT

Abstract:
TV commercials provide a host of pedagogical possibilities for any language class. One 30-second ad brings authentic linguistic and cultural content that can be integrated into various communicative activities. A commercial is not just a 30-second ad; it’s a story, a scene, a cast of characters, a dialogue, an array of emotions and even a bit of humor—the real dynamics of communication. The technology is basic (a computer, MP4 player and TV monitor) but the content delivered through appropriate commercials will bring English to life for your students. They will naturally react to the situation while empathizing with the characters and experiencing an emotional and often humorous side of English. Students are also motivated to improvise and modify the content while using the specific context as a framework for such co-creating and expanding. This technique borrows much from the methodology of using films in language education where listening and observing serve as foundational skills that naturally lead to discussion, critical thinking, role play, and writing activities. In this workshop I will demonstrate several methods for incorporating TV advertising into your class. I will also share some student examples while discussing the benefits, the technology, and a selection matrix.

Biographical data for each presenter.:
Philip McCasland is an Associate Professor at Fukushima University—Faculty of Economics and Business Administration; has lived and taught English in universities in Japan for more than 12 years; is the National Director of Programs for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT); taught in Korea for one year; has research interests that include business English, extensive reading, and administrative structures.

Location: 
Room B103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members, 500 yen for students

presentation, voting & discussion

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 24 October 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Wayne Malcolm

This meeting will be part presentation, part election, and part discussion on the future of the Akita chapter.

First,
The Presentation - Wayne Malcolm will be giving a short presentation on motivation regarding students, and teachers. He will share some of his ideas on how to keep both parties motivated.

Next,
The Election - You may or may not know, but long time chapter president, Takeshi Suzuki has stepped down. He, and the other Akita Chapter officers appointed Wayne Malcolm to be Acting President. There needs to be an official election choosing the next president. This is the time for those who might want to be president to put in his/her name.

After the new president is chosen, he/she will facilitate a discussion on the future of the Akita Chapter. Please bring ideas to share, as all members have a voice.

Location: 
B-103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members, 500 yen for students

My Lesson Plan

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 26 September 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
officers and participants

The main theme is "My Lesson Plan." Each officer will present what he/she does in their classrooms. They will share one or two of their lesson plans with the members at the meeting. The participants are expected to bring some of their ideas and classroom activities to share with everyone. All can certainly learn something from one another.

Location: 
B-103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members, 500 yen for students

Relating Culture to the teaching of communication strategies

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 25 July 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Alastair Graham-Marr

Abstract: This workshop will examine the ties between culture and the use of communication strategies in L1 and will look at the extent to which communication strategies employed in a learner L1 transfer naturally to English. It will then look at the two broad categories of communication strategies, affective strategies and management strategies. Participants will be asked to consider the possibility that students from different cultural backgrounds may differ in their need to be introduced to communication strategies. The use of affective strategies may differ between speakers from different cultures and how the use of management strategies may be affected by cultural differences in the employment of politeness strategies. Finally, the workshop will examine whether or not learners of English within an Asian context benefit from the explicit teaching of communication strategies and if so how these strategies might be introduced to learners.

Biography: Alastair Graham-Marr, M. Appl. Ling., has been teaching in Japan for over 20 years. He has presented at conferences in Thailand, the UAE, the US, Taiwan, Korea, Brazil and is a frequent presenter in Japan. For the past five years he has been an instructor on the David English House / OUP Certificate in Teaching Japanese Students course. Alastair is also author of Communication Spotlight: Speaking Strategies & Listening Skills, a series of textbooks for Oral Communication classes for high-school and college level students and is a full time teacher at Tokai University in Kanagawa.

Location: 
AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members, 500 yen for students

Try the opposite!

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 20 June 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
John F. Fanselow

abstract of "Try the opposite!"
During the workshop, we will pretend we are teaching at a school with the admonition TRY THE OPPOSITE! displayed in every classroom. Beneath the admonition are these rules:
N e v o a s t d w.
N a s t u w i a s t i t m.
N e g o a s t e g.
N a a s q-w q s a “W d t m?” o “W c w s t r t t?”
N a s t r o c w o s.
N a s t r o a t e a g t t p l.
N s w s a “v g, e, w” a s r.
N p d l p.
N t s w t a g t l d a l.
Or
Never explain vocabulary or ask students to define words.
Never ask students to use words in a sentence to illustrate their meaning.
Never explain grammar or ask students to explain grammar.
Never answer any student’s question-word questions such as “What does this mean?” or “Why can’t we say this rather than that?”
Never ask students to repeat or copy words or sentences.
Never ask students to read orally as their eyes are glued to the printed lines.
Never say words such as “very good, excellent, wonderful” after students respond.
Never prepare detailed lesson plans.
Never tell students what they are going to learn during a lesson.

During the workshop, we will generate ways to follow the admonition and follow the rules listed below the admonition. To ensure that the alternative practices are related to your day-to-day teaching, please bring one of the textbooks you use to the workshop. One of my central goals will be to illustrate ways you can with much less time and energy generate alternative activities with whatever textbooks you are using.

information about the presenter:
John has been involved in exploring teaching since 1961 in many countries, including many years in Japan. He believes that the only way to understand teaching is to transcribe short segments of lessons and analyze them in a playful way from many perspectives, much as those interested in drama analyze plays to understand them. Analysis to John means asking how activities we think are good are bad and how activities we think are bad are good.

Location: 
B-103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members, 500 yen for students

From Curiosity to Competency: Intercultural Activities for the ESL/EFL classroom

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 23 May 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Jon Dujmovich

Abstract:
Language educators often speak of using techniques and activities appropriate for each stage of language learning. But when it comes to incorporating cultural learning in the language lessons, there is usually very little consideration given to the learners' developmental stage of intercultural learning. The consequences of ill-matched activities can lead to reaffirmed or deeper cultural misunderstandings, and little or no growth in intercultural competency.

In this workshop the presenter will demonstrate and discuss how to incorporate culture-based activities into the ESL/EFL classroom according to the learners' intercultural developmental stage, age, language ability, and other factors. All activities and techniques demonstrated are grounded in intercultural communications theory and methodology coupled with ESL pedagogy. The presenter will provide opportunities to experiment with ideas and activities in a participant workshop format while demonstrating how the activities can be adjusted for learning stage appropriateness.

Presenter Biography:
Jon Dujmovich is an adjunct lecturer in the Department of Comparative Culture at Aichi University (Toyohashi) and Department of International Communication at Shizuoka University of Arts & Culture. He has over 15 years experience as a language teacher and corporate cross-cultural trainer in Japan. Jon is currently involved in developing a multicultural education training program for K-12 teachers in conjunction with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). In 2007 he was awarded a research award from the Suruga Institute for "The World in My Neighborhood Project," an EFL intercultural communications pilot course for 3rd year Junior High School students endorsed by the Shizuoka Prefectural Board of Education.

Location: 
AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for one-day members 500 yen for students

The Corpus in the Classroom

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 25 April 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Colin Graham

Abstract:
In this workshop, the presenter will lead a session to show the possibilities and pitfalls of introducing corpora in a practical way to the classroom. He will discuss aspects of building the corpus, ways to involve students in its creation and materials development. No prior knowledge of corpus linguistics is required or assumed.

Bio:
Colin Graham has been teaching English in Japan since 1998, prior to which he taught Mathematics and IT in London, as well as spending 10 years in different industries. He is currently the Co-ordinator for JALT’s Teacher Education SIG and Membership Chair for the forming Teachers Helping Teachers SIG. He is interested in learner autonomy, materials writing and professional development. He works for Sumikin-Intercom, a private language school providing English training for business people.

Location: 
B-103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
1,000 yen for non-JALT members, 500 yen for students

Recasting emotions in SLA: Insights from learning as a social transaction

Date and Time: 
Saturday, 14 March 2009 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker: 
Yasuhiro Imai, Ph.D.

What is the role and meaning of affect in second language acquisition (SLA)? Language practitioners have tackled this important question by exploring various affective factors, such as language anxiety, second language (L2) motivation, and the neurobiological mechanism. Nevertheless, serious discussions of the integral component of affect, emotions, have been rarity. This scholarly attitude reflects particular assumptions to conceive affect and learning, which can be characterized as individualistic, cognitive, dichotomous, and product-oriented.

While acknowledging the contribution made by the previous research paradigm, I propose a complementary perspective that calls for more substantial attention to the wide range of emotions in language learning. I take a particular view that emotions are not just a learner's inner, private workings that merely filter cognitive functioning. Rather, emotions--in any forms--can mediate development, especially when learning is considered a fundamentally interpersonal transaction.

By presenting actual data from a study, I illustrate how a group of learners discursively manifested, shared, and co-constructed their emotional attitudes toward their group work and how such emotional intersubjectivity pushed the group, in their knowledge co-construction, to challenge assigned tasks and materials. Finally, implications of the proposed perspective will be considered.

Biostatements:

Yasuhiro Imai is Lecturer at the Centre for the Teaching of Foreign Languages in General Education of Sophia University. His interests include emotions in second language learning, collaborative learning, and discourse analysis. He has taught EFL to Japanese university students.

Location: 
B-103 at AIU (Akita International University)
Fee for JALT members: 
Free
Fee for one-day members: 
Free
Published: Fri, 12/05/2008 - 8:41pm

Akita JALT usually meets on the 4th Saturday of every month.

  • Chapter President: Dougherty , Patrick
  • Membership Chair: Grafström, Ben
  • Program Chair: Dougherty , Patrick
  • Publicity Chair: Suzuki, Takeshi
  • Treasurer: Takahashi, Mamoru

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